Road Trauma Australia—Annual Summaries

Publication Type:
Statistical Report

Publication Subject(s):

ISBN:
978-1-925701-54-8

ISSN:
2205-4235

Release Date:
August 2018

This report is the latest in a series of annual road crash statistical reports. It presents annual counts of fatalities, fatal crashes and injuries and standardised rates. The focus is on the last ten years.

Data presented in this publication was correct as at March 2018. Due to normal ongoing revisions in road fatality data, comparisons between this publication and later reports will result in minor discrepancies.

2017 : At a glance

This report presents 2017 fatality counts, fatality rates and 10 year trends in crash-related road trauma, bringing together fatal crash and fatality data with exposure data and reproducing the 2016 NRSS performance indictors published on the roadsafety.gov.au website.

There were 1,226 road crash deaths in 2017, a decrease of 5.2 per cent from 2016. The reduction in deaths over ten years was 14.7 per cent, a trend annual reduction of 2.0 per cent. Many jurisdictions have shown increases over the most recent four years.

The rate of deaths per 100,000 population was 4.98 in 2017, a reduction of 6.7 per cent on 2016. All jurisdictions achieved trend reductions over the decade of 2.4 per cent per year or more.

Between 2008 and 2017 there were significant increases in deaths for over 65 age groups and significant reductions in deaths for all age groups under 40 years.

Population rates for people under 40 showed the greatest improvement, although the 17-25 age group remains above the overall average. Although the number of deaths in older age groups has increased, this increase is consistent with a growing older population as there has been a slight decline over the decade in the rate per 100,000 population.

High speed roads still account for the largest proportion of fatal crashes. In 2017 almost half (45 per cent) of all fatal crashes occur in posted speed zones of 100 km/hour or over, and only 12 per cent in speed zones of 50 km/hour or under. This has not changed appreciably over the last decade.

Approximately half of road deaths result from head-on crashes or single vehicle runoff-road crashes. This proportion has not changed over the four years to 2016.

Growth in population and traffic is off-setting many of the benefits of better roads and vehicles. During the ten years to 2017, total vehicle registrations increased by 23 per cent.

Bargraph with line showing annual counts of fatalities and annual rates per 100000 population